Presentation Abstract

Program#/Poster#: 306.7
Title: Visual projection of thoughts from single neurons in humans
Location: Room N426
Presentation Time: Monday, Oct 19, 2009, 9:30 AM - 9:45 AM
Authors: *M. CERF1,2, F. MORMANN2, N. THIRUVENGADAM3, A. KRASKOV4, R. QUIAN-QUIROGA5, C. KOCH2, I. FRIED6;
1Los Angeles, CA; 2Computation and Neural Systems, Caltech, Pasadena, CA; 3Carnegie-Mellon Univ., pittsburgh, PA; 4Motor Neurosci. and Movement Disorders, Univ. Col. London, London, United Kingdom; 5Univ. of Leicester, Leicester, United Kingdom; 6Neurosurg., Univ. of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA
Abstract: Despite recent advances in decoding neuronal information we are far from being able to reliably read someone else’s thoughts. Recent studies of single cells in the human medial temporal lobe (MTL) suggest the possibility of offline decoding of 60% of concepts earlier presented to subjects. We demonstrate the ability of epilepsy patients to voluntarily control the activity of a specific neuron previously found to represent a particular concept. By focusing their thoughts on a unique concept, patients were able to control a computer to make an image corresponding to that concept appear on a computer screen.
Patients could control the fading by focusing their thoughts on a given concept, thus eliciting activity in their brain similar to that exhibited by a direct presentation of the image of that concept.
We saw a striking success rate in a very short time. Across sessions, patients were able to succeed in 68% of the trials.
This experiment is the first demonstration of humans controlling the activity of single neurons by exploring the spectrum of associations or invariant representations of a given concept.
Disclosures:  M. Cerf, None; F. Mormann, None; N. Thiruvengadam, None; A. Kraskov, None; R. Quian-Quiroga, None; C. Koch, None; I. Fried, None.
Keyword(s): Single neuron recording in humans
Imagery
Attention
Support: Mathers foundation
[Authors]. [Abstract Title]. Program No. XXX.XX. 2009 Neuroscience Meeting Planner. Chicago, IL: Society for Neuroscience, 2009. Online.

2009 Copyright by the Society for Neuroscience all rights reserved. Permission to republish any abstract or part of any abstract in any form must be obtained in writing by SfN office prior to publication.




Note: When adding items to your Itinerary, please click "Add Checked Selections to My Itinerary" on EACH page of your search results.

About the Meeting

Sessions/Events

Registration

Hotel/Travel

Exhibits

Attendee Resources

Abstracts

Fellowships, Awards, and Prizes

Frequently Asked Questions

Final Program

Download Abstracts and
Daily Books to Your Kindle