Presentation Abstract

Session: G-38-Fitness
Saturday, Jun 02, 2012, 7:30 AM -11:00 AM
Presentation: 3471 - Running and All-cause Mortality Risk - Is More Better
Location: Exhibit Hall, Poster Board: 192
Pres. Time: Saturday, Jun 02, 2012, 9:30 AM -11:00 AM
Category: +501 disease prevention/treatment – epidemiology
Keywords: running; mortality
Author(s): Duck-chul Lee1, Russell R. Pate, FACSM1, Carl J. Lavie2, Steven N. Blair, FACSM1. 1University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC. 2Ochsner Health System, New Orleans, LA.
Abstract: PURPOSE: We examined the association between running and all-cause mortality risk in 52,656 adults (26% women) aged 20-100 years (mean age 43) who had a medical examination during 1971-2002 in the Aerobics Center Longitudinal Study.
METHODS: Participants were free of cardiovascular disease (CVD), cancer, abnormal resting or exercise electrocardiogram, and diabetes at baseline, and had ≥1 year of follow-up. Running and other physical activities were assessed on the medical history questionnaire by self-reported leisure-time activities during the past 3 months. Mortality follow-up was through 2003 using the National Death Index. Cox regression was used to quantify the association between running and mortality after adjusting for baseline age, sex, examination year, body mass index, current smoking, heavy alcohol drinking, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, parental CVD, and levels of other physical activities.
RESULTS: During an average follow-up of 15 years, 2,984 deaths occurred. Approximately 27% of adults participated in leisure-time running. Runners had 19% lower risk of all-cause mortality compared with non-runners, with U-shaped mortality curves for distance, speed, and frequency. The hazard ratios (95% confidence intervals) of all-cause mortality were 0.78 (0.64-0.96), 0.85 (0.73-0.99), 0.73 (0.60-0.89), 0.75 (0.57-0.97), 0.90 (0.67-1.22), and 0.95 (0.73-1.24) in 0.1-4.9, 5.0-9.9, 10.0-14.9, 15.0-19.9, 20.0-24.9, and ≥25.0 miles/week of running distance; 0.90 (0.75-1.08), 0.79 (0.68-0.91), 0.73 (0.61-0.86), and 0.93 (0.73-1.19) in 1-5, 6, 7, and ≥8 miles/hour of running speed; and 0.81 (0.49-1.32), 0.65 (0.46-0.92), 0.81 (0.65-0.997), 0.82 (0.71-0.94), 0.81 (0.66-0.99), 0.86 (0.65-1.14), and 0.95 (0.69-1.33) in 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7days/week of running frequency, respectively, compared with no running after adjusting for confounders including levels of other physical activities.
CONCLUSIONS: Running distances of 0.1-19.9 miles/week, speeds of 6-7 miles/hour, or frequencies of 2-5 days/week were associated with a lower risk of all-cause mortality, whereas higher mileage, faster paces, and more frequent running were not associated with better survival.
Supported by NIH Grant AG06945, HL62508, DK088195, and an unrestricted research grant from the Coca-Cola Company.
Disclosures:  D. Lee: None.